All Stories, Literally Reruns, Short Fiction

Literally Reruns – The Deep End by Sarah Dara

Leila has been passing some of the lock down – locked down. Down in the dark entrails of LS towers. When the noise of her hammering on the doors became too disturbing we let her out and gave her a bite to eat and a little drink. She brought this piece up with her and this is what she said:

This Sunday Rerun is brought to you by The Hand of Fate (from here, “THOF”). THOF is the dozzle* who mindlessly interferes with the run of our lives. THOF is lazy and corrupt. THOF does the terrible things he does because he can. But there are top secret circumstances in which THOF can be forced to do your bidding. I can’t go into the details, but recently I tricked THOF into doing something productive. Hence, THOF waved his hand toward this tidy little gem, which had lain all by its lonesome in the LS vault for more than three years.

It strikes me now that some of you might be thinking “She ‘can’t go into the details’ because there are no details for her to go into. She just said that so she could leave the paragraph and introduce the piece.”

Some of you are shrews. If you do not believe me then how do you account for the first sentence of this paragraph? THOF got involved when he moved my finger away from striking the d on the keyboard and directed it to the s. Hence the disingenuously contrite “Some of you are shrewd judges of character” was transformed into the much more heartfelt “Some of you are shrews.” The Hand of Fate is a mystery wrapped in an enigma dipped in questions and covered with donut sprinkles.

No matter how it was arrived at, The Deep End by Sarah Dara is worth a second look. And there might stand a chance that this will cause THOF to guide another story by the author to appear at LS sometime in the near future.

Q: You did such a wonderful job of getting the story across that the thoughtfully provided translations from Urdu to English were almost unnecessary. In which language was this originally written? And were there some concepts of minutia that were difficult to translate?

Q: Sometimes writing in the first person gives the writer too much leeway as to knowing what’s going on inside another person’s mind. Your MC felt things out and displayed a believable thinking process. Was this tough to do?

Q: No need for an answer here. But did any part of the introduction make sense to you?

Leila Allison

*Northwestern American slang meaning “douche-nozzle.”

I dealt THOF five cards. Each card

Sarah’s responses:

Q: You did such a wonderful job of getting the story across that the thoughtfully provided translations from Urdu to English were almost unnecessary. In which language was this originally written? And were there some concepts of minutia that were difficult to translate?

A: Thank you for your kind words. It is always a difficult decision to write in two languages and after I finish any piece of fiction, I always end up worrying if writing in both Urdu and English was the right decision. The Deep End was originally written in both. As a bilingual speaker, the mixing of both languages comes naturally to me as that is something I usually practice in everyday conversation as well. I also find that replacing some English words with Urdu ones helps to give the piece a more authentic feel. However, it is difficult to find the right Urdu word for many English ideas and vice versa, and that is where I find that providing a translation gets challenging. Once they are in my mind, Urdu colloquialisms in particular, are hard to explain in English and that is where I usually choose to leave them as they are.

Q: Sometimes writing in the first person gives the writer too much leeway as to knowing what’s going on inside another person’s mind. Your MC felt things out and displayed a believable thinking process. Was this tough to do?

A: I think what was toughest for me was describing the thoughts of a character with whom I have nothing in common with. A part of me always doubted if I portrayed her thoughts successfully because the experiences she goes through are so different than mine. I relied a lot on stories of people who were in similar situations and on my imagination to depict a believable thinking process. Other than this, the good thing is that once I have a character’s voice in my mind, it is usually quite easy for me to pen it down.

Q: No need for an answer here. But did any part of the introduction make sense to you?

A: I’m not sure what this question means. Could you explain a bit?

***

The Deep End

 

4 thoughts on “Literally Reruns – The Deep End by Sarah Dara”

  1. Hi Leila,
    As excellent as usual.
    And coming across as enigmatic as usual!

    Sara – I would just like to stat how much we are in awe of all bilingual writers. But there are so many that don’t have the quality of this.
    Hugh

    Like

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