Literally Reruns – Hugo and Me on the Moon by Pete Able

Leila has rootled out one of the few stories in the site that features an animal – well a bird actually but – you know- a not human character. Anyway here is what she said.

Persons whose surnames begin “Ab” usually find themselves first in alphabetized lines. This can be a blessing when the thing lined up for is free money, not so when it means setting the standard for both success and shame in Phys. Ed., with all eyes trained on the Ab-person, who is always the trend setter, willingly or otherwise. Moreover, in alphabetized competitions, we “All” types, usually found skulking a head or two back in the queue, do not root for the Ab person all that hard because whatever the Ab-person does will require some sort of effort on our part to equal or come reasonably close to what the Ab-person has accomplished. Putting forth any kind of effort is the bane of an All-person, who, despite the prefix, is usually not an “all in” person.

So it has come to pass that Pete Able is the first name people see when they visit the LS author index. This also means that his is the first name skipped by eyes that go down the queue in search of their own name. It’s a cruel and thoughtless world we live in that allows such circumstances to be, but every so often the light of hope shines on the unjustly overlooked.

Hugo and Me on the Moon deserves a second look because it is a rare funny-sad science fiction piece. The situation is as bleak as one can imagine, yet the desire to live, even in this worst possible scenario, is quite moving when you stop to think about it.

Q: Do you find it difficult to write scrupulous Sci-Fi and still endow it with the human touch?

Q: Please describe the process of moving the narrative along via use of the dialogue between the MC and the parrot. Even though a parrot doesn’t understand what it says, you were able to use that and have it make sense. I found that quite good and subtle.

Leila Allison

***

Hugo and Me on the Moon

Pete’s responses:

Q: Do you find it difficult to write scrupulous Sci-Fi and still endow it with the human touch?

A: This is pretty much the only Sci-Fi thing I’ve ever written. It was originally the first chapter of a book I started to write, but after the main character got picked up by an alien spaceship and was essentially lost in space, I lost much of the humor and didn’t know where to go with the plot. For me the humor of the story is what carries it along. I think that’s where the human touch comes in.

Q: Please describe the process of moving the narrative along via use of the dialogue between the MC and the parrot. Even though a parrot doesn’t understand what it says, you were able to use that and have it make sense. I found that quite good and subtle.

A: Thank you. It was fun to play with the dialogue between Hugo and the main character. I spend a lot of time writing inconsequential dialogue, dialogue that does little to further the plot but helps set a mood, and so this was like the epitome of that. Without really knowing what I was doing, it was interesting to find that even though Hugo didn’t know what he was saying, his words still had an effect on the main character and on the tone of the story. It’s funny, I tend to think of Hugo as a bit of a jerk, and that he got what he had coming, but really he’s just an innocent bird.

 

2 thoughts on “Literally Reruns – Hugo and Me on the Moon by Pete Able

  1. Hi Leila,
    I’d forgot how much I enjoyed this story.
    Love the questions for one specific reason…
    …Excellent answers Pete. I was very interested to read your thoughts on dialogue setting the mood. I totally agree that if dialogue is used well then so much of the soul destroying description can be cut right back.
    Hugh

    Like

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