Literally Stories Week 9

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Another week has passed and I still haven’t grown younger. Santa’s not paying his dividends. I guess I’ll live. Speaking of living (cheapest segway possible or maybe it’s segue – the one with the wheels): We Lived by our Adam West started the week. Once again we are engulfed with interest – yes it’s a fire and war reference –  into the historical fiction which Senõr West delivers so well.

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Midas Brown by Nik Eveleigh

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Midas Brown stands at the door of his shack and spits into the rain. When the storm broke an hour ago removing the oppressive heat of the day Midas was a happy man. Now, on reflection, as he scratches his sunken belly and listens to the water drumming against the iron overhang, he would gladly take the early evening sauna over this big shitty noise.

He digs around the cracked remains of a lateral incisor, works a sliver of tobacco loose and spits again. He knows the storm outside will pass soon enough.

He is less sure about the storm within.

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Bobby Aspergers by Todd Levin

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They were running everywhere, the children. There was this confident little girl running around, Judith, the one who’s name we wish we’d have thought of before Jennifer was born. She ran around within that, wearing this little pink polka dot dress. It was the kind of thing that if Patricia were here she’d talk about how she wishes she’d have been able to give it to Jennifer for Christmas and talk about how it would have suited ‘ours more’. Patricia wasn’t here today, she couldn’t be. The agency was taking off and at least one of us had to be there to man the phones and those phones had been ringing lately. It was finally working. That dream we’d had was getting there and was breaking the wall that had stopped it for the last five years. But she’d have been jealous of that kid of all things.

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Seven Days … A Bag Week by Hugh Cron – Adult Content

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Monday – Shopping.

Tom knew Steve and Carol well.  They were residents where he worked. They both relied on certain chemicals to function. In fact they relied on any chemicals to function. They were rattling big time. He gave them a nod as he headed into the pound shop. They called him back. There was no way that he was going to give them any money. They surprised him by not chancing it. They shot the breeze for a few minutes and then asked what Tom was buying. He  told them he was looking for note-pads. Carol whispered in his ear that if he wanted, they would lift them and only charge him half-price.

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Bubbles by Diane M Dickson

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Sylvie looked down at the dishes.  In the slightly greasy water her fingers disappeared under the foam. The light sparkled and popped as tiny globes exploded and infinitesimal rainbows vanished in the blink of an eye.

She had always loved bubbles, the luxurious bath type ones that wrapped you in a quilt of scented foam. The ones children, and sometimes Sylvie herself, made blowing through a plastic ring, and the sort that floated out of wonderful bubble machines. Of all the things she wished she had, and there were many, a bubble machine came pretty high on the list.

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¡WE LIVED! by Adam West

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Spring 1938.

Lars said to Miranda, “Understand this…” and left the table.

A series of explosions shook the six storey building but did not deter Miranda’s study of him; his untidy egress.

Through the narrow living space towards the sash window, she watched him go. Observed him at the window and after a time wondered why he found what was on the other side of the glass – a post-siesta pre-bombardment tableau in the still spring air – more compelling than whatever it was she supposed he intended to spout next.

If indeed there was more.

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Literally Stories Week 8

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This past week has been a smörgåsbord of thought-provoking pieces.  Yes we are very international and know words like smörgåsbord and… international.

The stories have given us moments of fear followed by moments of deliberation. And speaking of moments, we started the week off with Lissa’s. Lissa’s Moment that is. For a moment it lasted pretty long, in fact by the time the sequel came out it could no longer be called a moment, it had to be called: Lissa’s Flight.

That can’t be true, you say. Yes it is. It’s the way Diane chooses titles and speaking of titles and things that are true. Desmond Kelly’s True was our Wednesday story.

How could you possibly do a segment to the Thursday story? It will not be easy, in fact I have already lost my train of thoughts. Where was I? Oh yes, The Whereabouts of Mrs. Trisha by W D Frank is a dark and twisted tale, recommended for readers wanting a frightful experience or for people named Mrs. Trisha who are currently lost.

“Lost” you say? A bit like Elsa, the Friday story, about a young woman making a life changing decision.

Lastly but least leastly the story of the week for 12th to 16th January. Without fixing the numbers or allowing the lobbyist too much say. The last week winner is: Literally Stories Week 7. What? That has to be the rigged results. No the real winner is: The Front Page by David Louden. Congratulations to David Louden!

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Don’t forget you can vote for your choice of Story of the Week for the week ending 23rd January either here – right now – right on this page OR by clicking the link on the Header Menu or the cute little letter box in the side bar

Three Choices – No excuse – Come on support your favourite – please 🙂